Total Knee Replacement

Total knee replacement, also known as total knee arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure performed to replace a damaged or worn-out knee joint with an artificial joint (prosthesis). It is typically recommended for individuals with severe knee pain, stiffness, and disability caused by conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or knee injury.

Here are some key points about total knee replacement:

  1. Procedure: During the surgery, the damaged surfaces of the thigh bone (femur) and shin bone (tibia) are removed, and the joint is replaced with an artificial joint made of metal alloys, high-grade plastics, and polymers. In some cases, the undersurface of the kneecap (patella) may also be resurfaced.

  2. Indications: Total knee replacement is considered when conservative treatments, such as medications, physical therapy, assistive devices, and lifestyle modifications, no longer provide adequate relief from knee pain and functional limitations. The decision to undergo surgery is typically based on the severity of symptoms, the extent of joint damage, and the impact on daily activities and quality of life.

  3. Benefits: Total knee replacement can provide significant pain relief, improved mobility, and enhanced quality of life for individuals with severe knee arthritis. It can restore function, allowing individuals to engage in activities they were unable to do before surgery.

  4. Recovery and Rehabilitation: After surgery, a comprehensive rehabilitation program is crucial for optimal recovery. Physical therapy exercises, pain management, and gradual increase in activity levels are typically prescribed to regain knee strength, flexibility, and function. The duration of rehabilitation can vary but generally lasts several weeks to several months.

  5. Risks and Complications: As with any surgical procedure, total knee replacement carries certain risks, including infection, blood clots, bleeding, nerve or blood vessel injury, implant problems, stiffness, and allergic reactions. However, serious complications are rare, and the overall success rate of total knee replacement is high.

  6. Longevity of Implants: Modern knee implants are designed to be durable, and their lifespan can vary depending on several factors, such as an individual’s age, activity level, weight, and implant design. With proper care, knee replacements can last 15 to 20 years or longer before a revision surgery may be needed.

  7. Preoperative Preparation: Before the surgery, your healthcare team will conduct a thorough evaluation, including a medical history assessment, physical examination, and imaging tests. They may also provide instructions on preoperative preparations, such as discontinuing certain medications and making arrangements for post-surgery support and rehabilitation.

It’s important to consult with an orthopedic surgeon specializing in joint replacement to determine if total knee replacement is appropriate for your specific condition. They can provide detailed information, discuss potential risks and benefits, and guide you through the entire process, from preoperative planning to postoperative recovery and rehabilitation.

Total Hip Replacement

Total hip replacement, also known as total hip arthroplasty, is a surgical procedure performed to replace a damaged or diseased hip joint with an artificial joint, called a prosthesis. It is a common procedure recommended for individuals with severe hip pain, stiffness, and functional limitations caused by conditions such as osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, avascular necrosis, or hip fractures.

Here are some key points about total hip replacement:

  1. Procedure: During the surgery, the damaged or diseased parts of the hip joint, including the ball (head of the femur) and socket (acetabulum), are removed and replaced with artificial components. The femoral component consists of a metal stem with a ball on top, and the acetabular component is a metal socket lined with a plastic or ceramic liner.

  2. Indications: Total hip replacement is considered when conservative treatments, such as medications, physical therapy, assistive devices, and lifestyle modifications, no longer provide sufficient pain relief and functional improvement. The decision to undergo surgery is based on the severity of symptoms, the extent of joint damage, and the impact on daily activities and quality of life.

  3. Benefits: Total hip replacement can provide significant pain relief, improved mobility, and enhanced quality of life for individuals with severe hip arthritis or hip joint dysfunction. It can restore function, allowing individuals to engage in activities they were unable to do before surgery.

  4. Recovery and Rehabilitation: Following surgery, a rehabilitation program is essential for a successful recovery. Physical therapy exercises, pain management, and gradual increase in activity levels are typically prescribed to regain hip strength, flexibility, and function. The duration of rehabilitation can vary but generally lasts several weeks to several months.

  5. Risks and Complications: Like any surgical procedure, total hip replacement carries certain risks, including infection, blood clots, bleeding, nerve or blood vessel injury, dislocation of the joint, leg length discrepancy, and implant problems. However, serious complications are relatively rare, and the success rate of total hip replacement is generally high.

  6. Longevity of Implants: The lifespan of hip implants can vary depending on several factors, such as an individual’s age, activity level, weight, and implant design. With modern advancements in implant technology, most hip replacements can last 15 to 20 years or longer before a revision surgery may be needed.

  7. Preoperative Preparation: Before the surgery, your healthcare team will conduct a comprehensive evaluation, including a medical history assessment, physical examination, and imaging tests. They may also provide instructions on preoperative preparations, such as discontinuing certain medications and making arrangements for post-surgery support and rehabilitation.

It is important to consult with an orthopedic surgeon specializing in joint replacement to determine if total hip replacement is appropriate for your specific condition. They can provide detailed information, discuss potential risks and benefits, and guide you through the entire process, from preoperative planning to postoperative recovery and rehabilitation.

Knee Arthroscopy

Knee arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure performed to diagnose and treat various knee conditions. It involves inserting a small camera, called an arthroscope, into the knee joint through small incisions. The arthroscope allows the surgeon to visualize the inside of the knee on a monitor and perform necessary surgical interventions.

Here are some key points about knee arthroscopy:

  1. Procedure: Knee arthroscopy is typically performed under general or regional anesthesia. The surgeon makes small incisions around the knee and inserts the arthroscope, which transmits images of the joint to a monitor. Additional surgical instruments may be inserted through separate incisions to address specific issues.

  2. Indications: Knee arthroscopy can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It is commonly performed to evaluate and treat conditions such as meniscus tears, ligament injuries (e.g., anterior cruciate ligament or ACL tears), cartilage damage, loose bodies (small fragments of bone or cartilage), synovitis (inflammation of the joint lining), and some types of knee fractures.

  3. Benefits: Knee arthroscopy offers several advantages over traditional open surgery. It requires smaller incisions, resulting in less tissue trauma, reduced pain, quicker recovery, and minimal scarring. It is often an outpatient procedure, allowing patients to go home on the same day as the surgery.

  4. Recovery and Rehabilitation: After knee arthroscopy, rehabilitation is an essential part of the recovery process. The specific rehabilitation program will depend on the procedures performed during the arthroscopy. Physical therapy exercises, pain management, and gradual return to normal activities are typically prescribed to restore knee strength, range of motion, and function. Recovery times vary, but most individuals can resume their regular activities within a few weeks to a few months.

  5. Risks and Complications: While knee arthroscopy is generally considered safe, there are potential risks involved, although they are relatively rare. These can include infection, bleeding, blood clots, damage to surrounding structures, stiffness, persistent pain, and allergic reactions to anesthesia or surgical materials.

  6. Preoperative Preparation: Before the procedure, your healthcare team will conduct a thorough evaluation, including a medical history assessment, physical examination, and possibly imaging tests. They will provide instructions on preoperative preparations, such as fasting prior to surgery and discontinuing certain medications that may interfere with the procedure.

It is important to consult with an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in knee arthroscopy to determine if it is the appropriate procedure for your specific knee condition. They can provide detailed information, discuss potential risks and benefits, and guide you through the entire process, from preoperative planning to postoperative recovery and rehabilitation.

Shoulder Arthroscopy

Shoulder arthroscopy is a minimally invasive surgical procedure used to diagnose and treat various shoulder conditions. It involves the use of a small camera, called an arthroscope, which is inserted into the shoulder joint through small incisions. The arthroscope allows the surgeon to visualize the inside of the shoulder and perform necessary surgical interventions.

Here are some key points about shoulder arthroscopy:

  1. Procedure: Shoulder arthroscopy is typically performed under general anesthesia, although regional anesthesia or a nerve block may be used. The surgeon makes small incisions around the shoulder and inserts the arthroscope to visualize the joint. Additional surgical instruments are inserted through separate incisions to repair or treat specific issues.

  2. Indications: Shoulder arthroscopy can be used for both diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. It is commonly performed to evaluate and treat conditions such as rotator cuff tears, labral tears (such as Bankart or SLAP tears), shoulder impingement syndrome, shoulder instability, biceps tendon disorders, and shoulder joint inflammation.

  3. Benefits: Shoulder arthroscopy offers several advantages over traditional open surgery. It requires smaller incisions, resulting in less tissue trauma, reduced pain, quicker recovery, and minimal scarring. It is often performed on an outpatient basis, allowing patients to return home on the same day as the surgery.

  4. Recovery and Rehabilitation: After shoulder arthroscopy, a rehabilitation program is crucial for optimal recovery and restoration of shoulder function. The specific rehabilitation plan depends on the procedures performed during the arthroscopy. Physical therapy exercises, pain management, and a gradual return to normal activities are typically prescribed to regain shoulder strength, range of motion, and stability. Recovery times vary but can range from several weeks to a few months.

  5. Risks and Complications: While shoulder arthroscopy is generally considered safe, there are potential risks involved, although they are relatively rare. These can include infection, bleeding, nerve or blood vessel injury, stiffness, persistent pain, and allergic reactions to anesthesia or surgical materials.

  6. Preoperative Preparation: Before the procedure, your healthcare team will conduct a thorough evaluation, including a medical history assessment, physical examination, and possibly imaging tests. They will provide instructions on preoperative preparations, such as fasting prior to surgery and discontinuing certain medications that may interfere with the procedure.

It is important to consult with an orthopedic surgeon who specializes in shoulder arthroscopy to determine if it is the appropriate procedure for your specific shoulder condition. They can provide detailed information, discuss potential risks and benefits, and guide you through the entire process, from preoperative planning to postoperative recovery and rehabilitation.

Sports Injuries Treatment

Sports injuries can range from minor sprains and strains to more severe fractures and ligament tears. The treatment approach for sports injuries depends on the type and severity of the injury. Here are some common treatment strategies for sports injuries:

  1. Rest: Rest is often the first step in treating a sports injury. It allows the body time to heal and prevents further damage. Depending on the injury, rest may involve avoiding the specific activity or immobilizing the injured area with a splint or brace.

  2. Ice: Applying ice to the injured area can help reduce pain, swelling, and inflammation. Ice should be applied for about 15-20 minutes at a time, several times a day, during the initial stages of the injury.

  3. Compression: Compression helps control swelling and provides support to the injured area. Compression can be achieved using an elastic bandage or compression sleeve. It’s important to ensure that the compression is not too tight, as it can affect blood circulation.

  4. Elevation: Elevating the injured area above heart level helps reduce swelling by promoting proper fluid drainage. For example, if you have a leg injury, prop your leg up on pillows while resting.

  5. Medications: Over-the-counter nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen, can help reduce pain and inflammation. However, it’s important to consult with a healthcare professional before taking any medication, especially if you have any underlying medical conditions or are currently taking other medications.

  6. Physical Therapy: For more severe sports injuries or those requiring rehabilitation, physical therapy may be recommended. A physical therapist can provide exercises, stretches, and modalities to help restore strength, flexibility, and range of motion in the injured area.

  7. Immobilization: In some cases, immobilization of the injured area may be necessary to allow for proper healing. This may involve the use of a cast, splint, or brace, depending on the type and location of the injury.

  8. Surgical Intervention: For certain sports injuries, such as severe fractures or complete ligament tears, surgery may be required. Surgery aims to repair and stabilize the injured structures, followed by a rehabilitation program to regain strength and function.

  9. Rehabilitation and Return to Activity: Once the initial healing phase has passed, a structured rehabilitation program is often prescribed to gradually restore function and safely return to sports or physical activity. This may involve targeted exercises, flexibility training, coordination drills, and sport-specific activities.

It’s important to consult with a healthcare professional, such as a sports medicine physician or orthopedic specialist, for an accurate diagnosis and appropriate treatment plan for your specific sports injury. They can provide personalized guidance, monitor your progress, and help you safely navigate the recovery process.

Joint Preservation Surgery

Joint preservation surgery is a set of surgical techniques and procedures aimed at preserving and restoring the function of a damaged joint. It is typically performed for individuals with joint conditions, such as early-stage arthritis, cartilage defects, or ligament injuries, who wish to delay or avoid joint replacement surgery. The goal of joint preservation surgery is to alleviate pain, improve joint function, and potentially delay or prevent the need for joint replacement.

Here are some common joint preservation surgeries:

  1. Arthroscopy: Arthroscopy is a minimally invasive procedure that uses a small camera (arthroscope) and surgical instruments to visualize and treat various joint conditions. It can be used to repair or remove damaged cartilage, remove loose bodies, address ligament injuries, and smooth rough joint surfaces.

  2. Osteotomy: Osteotomy involves the surgical realignment of bones to redistribute the forces on a joint. It is commonly performed in individuals with early-stage osteoarthritis to relieve pain and improve joint function. Osteotomy is often performed on weight-bearing joints, such as the knee or hip.

  3. Cartilage Repair and Restoration: Various techniques can be used to repair or restore damaged cartilage in a joint. These may include microfracture, mosaicplasty (osteochondral autograft transplantation), autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI), and matrix-assisted autologous chondrocyte transplantation (MACT). These procedures aim to promote the growth of new cartilage or replace damaged cartilage with healthy tissue.

  4. Ligament Reconstruction: Ligament injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears, may be treated with ligament reconstruction surgery. This procedure involves replacing the torn ligament with a graft, which can be harvested from your own tissue or a donor source. Ligament reconstruction restores stability to the joint and helps prevent further damage.

  5. Biological Joint Resurfacing: In certain cases, joint surfaces can be resurfaced using biological techniques. These techniques involve the transplantation of healthy cartilage or other tissue into the damaged joint to improve its function and reduce pain. Examples include autologous chondrocyte implantation (ACI) and osteochondral allograft transplantation.

  6. Joint Fluid Therapy: In some cases, joint preservation involves non-surgical treatments such as injections of hyaluronic acid or platelet-rich plasma (PRP). These therapies aim to lubricate the joint, reduce inflammation, and promote healing.

It’s important to note that joint preservation surgery is not suitable for everyone. The specific procedure recommended depends on several factors, including the type and severity of the joint condition, the individual’s age, overall health, and lifestyle. It is essential to consult with an orthopedic specialist or a surgeon specializing in joint preservation to determine the most appropriate treatment option for your specific joint condition. They can evaluate your condition, discuss potential risks and benefits, and guide you through the decision-making process.

Fracture Treatment

Fracture treatment aims to align and stabilize the broken bones to promote healing and restore normal function. The specific treatment approach depends on various factors, including the type, location, and severity of the fracture. Here are some common methods used in fracture treatment:

  1. Immobilization: Immobilization is often the first step in fracture treatment. It involves keeping the broken bones in proper alignment and preventing movement to allow for healing. Immobilization can be achieved using casts, splints, braces, or slings, depending on the type and location of the fracture.

  2. Reduction: In some cases, the fractured bones need to be manually realigned. This procedure is called a reduction. There are two types of reductions: closed reduction and open reduction. Closed reduction involves manipulating the bones back into alignment without surgical incisions, while open reduction involves surgically accessing the fracture site to realign the bones.

  3. External Fixation: External fixation involves the use of external devices, such as pins, wires, or frames, to stabilize the fracture. These devices are placed outside the body and attached to the bone fragments, providing stability while allowing for proper healing. External fixation is often used for complex fractures, severe open fractures, or fractures with soft tissue damage.

  4. Internal Fixation: Internal fixation involves the surgical placement of implants, such as plates, screws, rods, or nails, directly into the fractured bones to hold them in place. This method provides stable fixation, promotes bone healing, and allows for early mobilization. Internal fixation is commonly used for fractures that are difficult to immobilize or have a high risk of displacement.

  5. Rehabilitation: Once the fractured bones have been stabilized, rehabilitation plays a crucial role in the recovery process. Physical therapy exercises, range of motion activities, and functional training are typically prescribed to regain strength, flexibility, and functional abilities. Rehabilitation helps restore normal function and reduce the risk of complications, such as stiffness or muscle weakness.

  6. Pain Management: Pain management is an important aspect of fracture treatment. It may involve the use of pain medications, such as over-the-counter pain relievers or stronger prescription medications, to alleviate discomfort during the healing process.

  7. Follow-up Care: Regular follow-up appointments with a healthcare professional are essential to monitor the healing progress and ensure proper bone alignment. X-rays or other imaging tests may be performed to assess the healing process and determine if any adjustments to the treatment plan are necessary.

It’s important to seek immediate medical attention if you suspect a fracture. A healthcare professional, typically an orthopedic specialist, will evaluate the fracture, determine the most appropriate treatment approach, and guide you through the recovery process. Treatment plans are tailored to individual circumstances, so it’s crucial to follow the advice and recommendations of your healthcare provider for optimal fracture healing and recovery.

Stem Cell & PRP Injection

Stem cell therapy and platelet-rich plasma (PRP) injection are regenerative medicine techniques used in the treatment of various musculoskeletal conditions, including injuries and degenerative disorders. Both therapies aim to promote tissue healing and regeneration. Here’s an overview of stem cell therapy and PRP injection:

  1. Stem Cell Therapy:

    • Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that have the potential to develop into different types of cells in the body.
    • In stem cell therapy, stem cells are obtained from various sources, such as bone marrow, adipose tissue (fat), or umbilical cord blood.
    • The stem cells are then processed and prepared for injection into the affected area.
    • When injected, the stem cells can differentiate into specific cell types, promote tissue repair, and modulate the immune response.
    • Stem cell therapy is being researched and used clinically for conditions such as osteoarthritis, tendon and ligament injuries, cartilage defects, and certain bone fractures.
    • The effectiveness and safety of stem cell therapy are still being studied, and it may not be suitable or approved for all conditions.
  2. Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Injection:

    • PRP is a concentration of platelets derived from the patient’s own blood. Platelets contain growth factors and other bioactive substances that promote healing and tissue regeneration.
    • The procedure involves drawing a small amount of the patient’s blood and spinning it in a centrifuge to separate the platelet-rich plasma from other blood components.
    • The concentrated PRP is then injected into the affected area to stimulate tissue repair and regeneration.
    • PRP injections are commonly used for conditions such as tendonitis, ligament injuries, muscle strains, and osteoarthritis.
    • The effectiveness of PRP injections varies depending on the specific condition and individual response. Multiple injections may be needed for optimal results.

It’s important to note that while stem cell therapy and PRP injection are considered promising treatment approaches, more research is needed to establish their effectiveness for various conditions. Additionally, the availability and regulations surrounding these therapies can vary depending on the country or region.

If you’re considering stem cell therapy or PRP injection, it’s crucial to consult with a qualified healthcare professional who specializes in regenerative medicine or orthopedics. They can evaluate your specific condition, discuss the potential benefits and risks, and help determine the most appropriate treatment options for you.

Paediatric Orthopedics

Pediatric orthopedics is a specialized branch of orthopedic medicine that focuses on the diagnosis, treatment, and management of musculoskeletal conditions in children, infants, and adolescents. It deals with a wide range of congenital, developmental, and acquired conditions affecting the bones, joints, muscles, ligaments, and tendons in pediatric patients. Here are some key aspects of pediatric orthopedics:

  1. Developmental Conditions: Pediatric orthopedic specialists often manage developmental conditions that affect children’s musculoskeletal system. This can include developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH), clubfoot, scoliosis, limb length discrepancy, and congenital limb abnormalities. Early detection and intervention are crucial to optimize outcomes.

  2. Fractures and Trauma: Children are susceptible to fractures and other orthopedic injuries due to their active lifestyles and growing bones. Pediatric orthopedic surgeons are experienced in managing and treating fractures in children, which may require specialized techniques to accommodate the child’s unique growth patterns and healing potential.

  3. Sports Injuries: Pediatric orthopedic specialists also treat sports-related injuries in children and adolescents. These injuries can range from sprains and strains to more severe ligament tears, growth plate injuries, and stress fractures. Prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and rehabilitation are essential for optimal recovery and prevention of long-term complications.

  4. Musculoskeletal Infections: Infections can affect the musculoskeletal system in children, leading to conditions such as osteomyelitis (bone infection) or septic arthritis (joint infection). Pediatric orthopedic surgeons work closely with infectious disease specialists to diagnose and treat these infections, often involving a combination of antibiotics, drainage procedures, and surgery if necessary.

  5. Neuromuscular Conditions: Pediatric orthopedics encompasses the management of neuromuscular conditions, such as cerebral palsy, spina bifida, muscular dystrophy, and other conditions that affect muscle tone, coordination, and movement. Treatment may involve a multidisciplinary approach, including physical therapy, orthotic devices, surgical interventions, and ongoing follow-up care.

  6. Congenital Deformities: Pediatric orthopedic surgeons treat congenital deformities, which are abnormalities present at birth. These can include conditions like congenital scoliosis, hip dysplasia, limb deformities, and skeletal dysplasias. Early detection and intervention are crucial to address these conditions and promote normal growth and development.

  7. Limb Reconstruction: In cases of significant limb deformities or length discrepancies, pediatric orthopedic surgeons may perform limb reconstruction procedures. These surgeries involve various techniques, including limb lengthening, deformity correction, and bone grafting, to restore limb function and appearance.

  8. Non-Surgical and Surgical Interventions: Pediatric orthopedic treatment may involve both non-surgical and surgical interventions. Non-surgical treatments may include physical therapy, bracing, casting, and medication. When surgery is required, pediatric orthopedic surgeons employ techniques that take into account the child’s growth potential and aim to preserve as much function as possible.

Pediatric orthopedic care requires specialized knowledge, expertise, and a comprehensive understanding of children’s unique musculoskeletal needs. If your child has a musculoskeletal condition, it is important to consult with a pediatric orthopedic specialist who can provide a thorough evaluation, accurate diagnosis, and develop a tailored treatment plan to meet your child’s specific needs.

Spine & Back Care

Spine and back care involves the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of conditions affecting the spine, including the vertebrae, discs, nerves, muscles, and ligaments. Maintaining a healthy spine is essential for overall well-being and mobility. Here are some key aspects of spine and back care:

  1. Good Posture: Maintaining good posture is crucial for a healthy spine. Practice proper body mechanics during daily activities, such as sitting, standing, and lifting heavy objects. Avoid prolonged sitting or standing in the same position and make ergonomic adjustments to your workspace to support good posture.

  2. Regular Exercise: Engage in regular physical activity that includes exercises to strengthen the back, core muscles, and supporting structures. Activities like walking, swimming, yoga, and Pilates can help improve flexibility, strengthen muscles, and support a healthy spine.

  3. Weight Management: Maintaining a healthy weight reduces stress on the spine and decreases the risk of developing conditions like back pain, osteoarthritis, and herniated discs. Proper nutrition and regular exercise are essential for weight management.

  4. Proper Lifting Techniques: When lifting heavy objects, use your legs instead of your back to minimize strain on the spine. Bend your knees, keep the load close to your body, and avoid twisting motions while lifting.

  5. Ergonomics: Ensure that your work environment, including your desk, chair, and computer setup, is ergonomically designed to promote good posture and reduce strain on the spine. Adjust the height and position of your workstation to maintain proper alignment of the spine.

  6. Back Strengthening Exercises: Incorporate exercises that specifically target the muscles of the back and core into your fitness routine. Strengthening these muscles helps support the spine and can reduce the risk of back pain and injuries.

  7. Flexibility Exercises: Stretching exercises, such as yoga or Pilates, can improve flexibility and promote a full range of motion in the spine. Flexibility exercises help maintain spinal mobility and reduce the risk of stiffness and pain.

  8. Avoid Prolonged Inactivity: Prolonged periods of inactivity, such as sitting for long hours, can contribute to back pain and stiffness. Take regular breaks to move, stretch, and change positions throughout the day.

  9. Proper Lifting of Heavy Objects: When lifting heavy objects, use proper lifting techniques to protect your back. Bend your knees, keep your back straight, and lift with your leg muscles rather than your back muscles.

  10. Seek Medical Evaluation: If you experience persistent or severe back pain, or if you have any concerns about your spine health, it’s important to seek medical evaluation from a healthcare professional specializing in spine care. They can provide an accurate diagnosis, recommend appropriate treatment options, and guide you through the recovery process.

Remember, these tips are general recommendations and may not be suitable for everyone. It’s always a good idea to consult with a healthcare professional or a spine specialist for personalized advice and guidance based on your specific condition and needs.

Welcome to Vibha Orhto Neuro Care, where we are dedicated to providing exceptional care for orthopedic and neurological conditions. Our clinic is staffed by a team of highly skilled and experienced orthopedic surgeons, neurologists, and healthcare professionals who specialize in the diagnosis, treatment, and management of a wide range of musculoskeletal and neurological disorders.

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